Post 11: The Public Shaming of Blackgirl Natural Hair

*Special thanks to Armani Jamieson for sending me her beautiful photos for the featured image!*
 
I don’t know whether I’ve ever written about natural hair on my blog. Today though, I needed to share an article I wrote on EverydayFeminism.com with you because it resonated with both Black and White women in so many ways.  It was shared more than 600 times and received almost 200 comments on Facebook.  That’s a lot for me, and I’m excited about the conversations that it likely stirred among people who may have never considered some of what I shared.

As you may (or may not) already know, natural hair for many Black women is about so much more than just hair. Returning to our roots by way of our hair is a personal journey of escaping the weight of popular public opinion. Returning to our roots is about deciding not to give a shit about whether people get it or not. Returning to our roots is about personal choice and public celebration of an aspect of ourselves in its natural state. Click the image below to see why I say this:

If we truly want to distance ourselves from the centuries of varied invisibility, we should seek a knowledge of self that nurtures confidence and freedom of choice.

We should look at the ways Black women are being marketed to and convinced of the need to purchase things — be they chemical “relaxers” or curl puddings — to be somehow better.

We should question whether this notion of hair manageability is about comfort and ease, dollars and cents — or if it’s just another effective means of separating us from one another.

We should explore and express ourselves through the results of self-inquiry, instead of the effects of self-doubt and societal pressure.

That may be the start of a movement away from the -isms and prisons and onto a healthier space.

That may just be a way to solve the issue of demonized kitchens and unconscious choice, and every woman’s right to rock her coif in whatever way suits her soul.

If you can’t see the image below, CLICK HERE to read the article.